Chapter 12 – The Rise of other Sunni Islamic Movements

This is a serialization of the book titled ‘Crisis in Islam’. The full book and its Endnotes may be accessed here:


As soon as Zionist Imperialism gained control of the Arabian Peninsula after enabling the Wahhābis of Mecca, it scrambled to contain the rest of the Arab world through Islam. The Orientalists and researchers in the Zionist institutes in Europe and America were not oblivious to the fact that the rest of the Arab world was not generally like the Arabian Peninsula and Gulf in backwardness. This meant that it would not have been easy to export Wahhābi ideology to the rest of the Arab world, especially if they took into account that the aspirations of the new educated population in Egypt, Syria and Iraq were toward freedom more than to return their thoughts to previous centuries about which these people had no knowledge save perhaps an idyllic vision that had no deep roots.

It does not matter that Zionist Imperialists had contributed to the rise of Islamic movements in the Arab East or that it embraced these movements after their rise. What is important is that the religious movements that have arisen in the Arab East were mostly acting in accordance with the Zionist interests in the Arab world.

Eastern Arabs of the northern parts of the Arabian Peninsula would not have been satisfied with a simple call, such as that by Abdul-Wahhāb, which was no more than a superficial look at the meaning of monotheism, which he himself had not understood at all. These Arabs, by virtue of their intellectual antecedence over the Bedouin of the Arabian Peninsula and the Gulf, were looking to link the state and religion in a new world, where relations are governed by new principles, such as the nation-state, international relations and the so-called ‘international law’, as well as treaties and alliances mostly created outside the scope of Islam without consultation with the Muslims. In other words, the nascent generation of Muslims of the East (which maybe is a loose term) wanted a political theory that may not be separated from Islam but able to deal realistically with the world where Muslims live after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, which had for centuries been a distorted face of Islam. Wahhābi naïve ideology was not able to satisfy this aspiration, or even deal with the realities that surrounded the Muslim World.

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This is the story behind the court case on Aggression in invading Iraq in 2003 against Tony Blair and others in the High Court in London.

Background I started my life as an electrical/electronics engineer having studied at Baghdad University and specialised in Microwave Communication at UCL. I left Iraq in 1980 for political reasons. This…

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Chapter 11 – Wahhābism in the Service of Imperialism

This is a serialization of the book titled ‘Crisis in Islam’. The full book and its Endnotes may be accessed at: https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/Books/Crisis-Islam-Dr-Abdul-Haq-Al-Ani-Author/0993572006/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1486203904&sr=1-1&keywords=The+crisis+in+Islam ______________________________________________________________ I explained in the previous chapter how…

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Chapter 10 – Inventing Wahhabism

This is a serialization of the book titled ‘Crisis in Islam’. The full book and its Endnotes may be accessed at:

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The objective of my writing on this subject is the attempt to figure out the origin of the culture of killing in Islam: how it started and how it eventually controlled the minds of Muslims so much so that it has become accepted for the mosque preacher to stand and tell people about the glory of killing for Allah. Comprehending these facts may lead us to reconsider our inherited culture in order to correct our understanding of history. Otherwise we would not have a foothold in the world and, while others move forward, we will stay stuck in the same state of being, if not slide into decline, which is the essence of backwardness!

I wrote in the previous chapter on the emergence of a class of those called ‘scholars’ (fuqahā) who wrote on worldly matters more than on matters of spirituality and religion, but were able to dominate the minds of the people and terrorised them. They did this to the extent that no Muslim dared ask about any subjects not approved by those fuqahā for fear of being accused of heresy or blasphemy. This explains the reason for the failure of the Islamic mind to produce good independent thought. (more…)

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Chapter 9 – Intellectual Terrorism of Shari’a

This is a serialization of the book titled ‘Crisis in Islam’. The full book and its Endnotes may be accessed at: https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/Books/Crisis-Islam-Dr-Abdul-Haq-Al-Ani-Author/0993572006/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1486203904&sr=1-1&keywords=The+crisis+in+Islam ______________________________________________________________ Nowhere in the Holy Qur'an does the…

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Chapter 8 – Misinterpreting the Qur’an

This is a serialization of the book titled ‘Crisis in Islam’. The full book and its Endnotes may be accessed at:

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I ended the previous chapter by reaching an important conclusion proven by history, which is that, since the first year of the departure of the Prophet, Muslims have accepted killing a Muslim if he/she withholds from the Caliph a camel’s tethers.

Would the observer today be surprised seeing the culture of takfir (accusations of apostasy) and murder, being revived in this horrific way, having had its foundations set since the first year after the death of the Prophet?

 
This is an extremely serious issue because deeming so easy the killing of a Muslim cannot but lead to the belief and conviction, apparent or hidden, that killing non-Muslims must be still easier. That is how the culture of killing in Islam began growing gradually as we will see.

 
As soon as the ‘wars of apostasy’ were over, Muslims began looking for new wars outside the borders of the Arabian Peninsula. Thus began the new page of ‘Islamic Invasions’ that colored the history of Islam from that day until the end of the Ottoman Empire in the early twentieth century.

 
I have already demonstrated how Muslim history glorifies ‘invasions’, to the extent that it calls the wars in which the Prophet fought in defense of the Muslims ‘invasions’ (Ghazwat). This invasion is nothing but a word of rebuke in the Qur’an, where the Almighty uses the word ‘invade’ (Ghazu) only for the unbelievers. The word was not even once used to describe the Muslim believers. How then did historians and scholars permit themselves to use this word in the biography of the Prophet?

 

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Chapter 7 – Wars of Apostasy

This is a serialization of the book titled ‘Crisis in Islam’. The full book and its Endnotes may be accessed at: https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/Books/Crisis-Islam-Dr-Abdul-Haq-Al-Ani-Author/0993572006/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1486203904&sr=1-1&keywords=The+crisis+in+Islam ______________________________________________________________ The search for the roots of the…

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Chapter 6 – Islam, Jizya or Death

This is a serialization of the book titled ‘Crisis in Islam’. The full book and its Endnotes may be accessed at:


In the previous chapter, I concluded that Islam came to the Arabs in their tongue and it did not come to others, because Allah has committed Himself that He would not punish until He sends a messenger, and He would warn every people in their tongue. That is what He did with the Hebrews in Hebrew, with Arameans in Aramaic, and no doubt with the Chinese in Chinese and with the Indians in Hindi and the like. Thus He equally did with the Arabs in Arabic.

This is His wisdom and His justice and they cannot be but that.

When His non-Arab servant stands before Him, how is He going to judge that servant for not accepting the Qur’an, which came in a language foreign to him? Isn’t that servant entitled to ask the Almighty, why he was told to follow a Messenger in a language he was not created with, and to read a book that was sent to another people, telling them stories and lessons from their history, without this book mentioning one story or lesson of what happened to the people of that servant, now standing before Him?

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Chapter 5 – Islam Came Only to the Arabs Not to Spread by Sword

This is a serialization of the book titled ‘Crisis in Islam’. The full book and its Endnotes may be accessed at:


The previous chapter was concluded by questioning whether the origin of the culture of killing in Islam was religious or political. It is relevant that before searching for the roots of the culture of killing, we need first to consider punishment in Islam.

Reward and punishment, as every Muslim knows, are in Allah’s hands. Allah has willed, in His absolute wisdom, to punish or forgive, as He wants, in this life or in the hereafter. The Almighty also distinguished between offences that call for punishment, dividing them into two parts: an offence that affects the general public being a public offence, and an offence that affects only its owner being a private offence. When the Almighty laid down His rules for nations, He decided that the community has the right to punish for the public offence, but He did not give that community the right to punish for private offence, as He kept that for Him to punish or forgive as He pleases.

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Chapter 4 – The Birth of Muslim Invasions

This is a serialization of the book titled ‘Crisis in Islam’. The full book and its Endnotes may be accessed at:


I ended the previous chapter with an enquiry about what Muslims did to Muslims and non-Arabs whose land they invaded. I intend to elaborate on this, not out of a wish to discredit what Muslims have glorified for centuries, but to understand the reasons behind what is happening today. I believe that today’s culture is very much connected to that history, and we must be able to admit that and accept a critical review of our history. We should aim at achieving a rationality that will enable us to understand our message to mankind, if we have any message left.

No sooner had the Prophet departed this world than the age of Jāhiliya (ignorance) raised its head again.[i] That should not be surprising, as ethics and norms do not change overnight.  It may not be easy for every man to shed the dress of ignorance just by reciting the Shahāda (declaration of faith).[ii] (more…)

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